EXCLUSIVE: Why APC rescheduled primaries in Niger after 3 senators “lost out”

OrderPaperToday – The Acting National Publicity Secretary of the All Progressive Congress (APC), Yekini Nabena, has revealed to OrderPaper Nigeria why the Party postponed its Senatorial primaries in Niger State to Friday. This is despite widespread media reports of the primaries being held on Tuesday where all three incumbent APC Senators from the state lost.

According to reports, Senator David Umaru (Niger East), Senator Sabi Abdullah (Niger North) and Senator Mustapha Mohammed (Niger South) all lost to newcomers in the Senatorial primaries held across the state on Tuesday.

While speaking to the media following the announcement of the results, Senator David Umaru rejected the outcome of the polls describing it as a “shame” to APC. He alleged that the primaries were characterised by financial inducements, voter intimidation and the manipulation of results.

However, in a statement released today, the APC announced that the Senatorial Primaries for Niger State will now hold on Friday the 5th of October 2018.

The three Niger state senators who reportedly lost on Tuesday were cleared by the Party’s National Working Committee (NWC) to contest in Friday’s primaries.

Explaining the development today, the APC spokesman told OrderPaper Nigeria that the primaries earlier held on Tuesday are null and void as it was conducted by the State Governor, Abubakar Bello, in complete disregard for the NWC of the Party and its constitution.

According to Nabena: “The Governor went ahead to do what he thought was right and it is not permitted by the Party. You must follow the procedure for conducting primaries, he acted on his own.”

However, the APC’s National Publicity Secretary was non-committal when asked if the Party would take disciplinary action against the Governor, stressing that the matter has been addressed with the approval of Friday as the authentic date for the primaries.

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