Female bench warmer Reps in 2018

OrderPaperToday – In this series of our special year end reports, our focus on female lawmakers in the House of Representatives brings legislative performance in view. Having examined the top performers in an earlier publication, this piece lays out the bench warmers who should have used the opportunity of being in the House to raise the demand for more female representation in parliament.

Fortunately or unfortunately for them, it is easy to play inertia in the green chamber because of the difficulty in monitoring all 360 members. However, with the few women, absenteeism or inactivity would be noticed before long.

So here is our female bench warmer lawmakers of the House of Representatives in 2018:

Owodighe Ekpotai

Definitely topping this list is Owodighe Ekpotai, the representative of Eket Federal constituency who is absent a lot at plenary and stays more mute the few times she attends.

In the past 11 months, if decisions are taken every day with effect on Eket people, their voice would not be heard. Even before the political campaigns set in to ‘prevent’ lawmakers from being active in their legislative duties, Ekpotai still never moved any notable motion.

Although she has a couple of bills to her name, her ranking is pretty low in comparison with other female counterparts.

However, the green chamber might not be seeing her in the next assembly as she reportedly lost the primary election.

Stella Ngwu

There is really nothing of serious worth to support Stella Ngwu’s membership of the House of Representatives. Thus her constituents of Igbo-Etiti/Uzo-Uwani federal constituency of Enugu State may have been short-changed afterall.

Following a legal challenge, she was removed by the Federal High Court in Abuja in October 2016, but won her seat back at the Appeal court.

The major news report on her as far as parliamentary activities is concerned could be traced to 2016 but her attendance this year has been terribly low.

Dorothy Mato

Mrs. Mato only joined the green chamber in 2017 after over two years of legal battle to reclaim her mandate.

The Supreme Court of Nigeria, on the 25th of June last year, in a unanimous judgement, sacked Herman Hembe to pave way for her even though she had to fight another ‘battle’ with the leadership of the House before she was eventually sworn in.

One would have expected the lawmaker representing Konshisha/Vandeikya federal constituency of Benue State to set the ball rolling in a bid to cover for lost years.

Sadly, that has not been the case as she rarely contributed to debate on the floor and have scanty bills to her name.

Linda Ikpeazu

This former beauty queen who represents Onitsha north/south federal constituency of Anambra State, has one of the poorest attendance record in the green chamber.

This may as a result of her entry into motherhood after she was delivered of a set of twins at the age of 52.

Although her case reminds one of the Icelandic parliamentarian, Unnur Bra Konradsdottir, who appeared in parliament while breast-feeding her 6-week-old daughter, Linda has played truancy effectively.

Eucharia Azodo

This lawmaker is sister to Senator Andy Uba. She is another silent female voice in 2018. Not much as been heard of her this year, thus effectively denying her people of Aguata federal constituency of quality representation.

Joan Mrakpor

Mrs. Mrakpor, wife of the Attorney General of Delta State has had a quiet 2018 in the House. Because she seconded a couple of motions, she is not on the main list of five above.

Boma Goodhead

Boma, younger sister of popular Niger delta militant activist, Asari Dokubo, became popular following her display of “bravado” during the DSS siege at the National Assembly. Before and after that episode, nothing is known to her name in terms of motions or bills. She is from Rivers State.

Vitali Asabe

Despite being the representative of Damboa/Gwoza/Chibok, Borno State which is a spotlight of boko haram activity, very little is heard of Vitali Asabe in the House. Her attendance is not impressive however.

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